Hong Kong protesters surround police headquarters in fresh rallies

Hong Kong protesters surround go

Hong Kong protesters surround police headquarters in fresh rallies

Hong Kong protesters surround government offices in fresh rallies as they continue to demand Beijing-backed leader Carrie Lam scrap the extradition bill

  • Thousands of protesters rallied after the  the expiry of a deadline demonstrators had set for the government
  • They gathered outside government offices in Admiralty before marching to police headquarters in Wan Chai 
  • Protesters are demanding the government fully retract the law and drop all charges against those arrested 
  • They also want an investigation into allegations of police brutality and stop referring to the protests as a riot
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Thousands of protesters rallied in Hong Kong today after the expiry of a deadline demonstrators had set for the government to completely scrap a controversial extradition bill, in the latest wave of protests in the Chinese-ruled city.

Demonstrators, mostly students dressed in black, gathered outside the government headquarters in Admiralty early morning to vent their anger and frustration at Beijing-backed leader Carrie Lam who promoted, and then postponed, the bill after mass protests.

Protesters, who have been largely leaderless during the rallies, then marched in the sweltering heat of about 30 degrees Celsius (86°F) to police headquarters in Wan Chai, with many chanting 'release the righteous' and 'shame on police thugs' - references to those detained during violence last week between demonstrators and the police. 

Demonstrators, mostly students dressed in black, gathered outside the government headquarters in Admiralty this morning to vent their anger at Beijing-backed leader Carrie Lam who promoted, and then postponed, the bill after mass protests

Demonstrators, mostly students dressed in black, gathered outside the government headquarters in Admiralty this morning to vent their anger at Beijing-backed leader Carrie Lam who promoted, and then postponed, the bill after mass protests

Protesters, who have been largely leaderless during the rallies, then marched in the sweltering heat of about 30 degrees Celsius (86°F) to police headquarters in Wan Chai, with many chanting 'release the righteous' and 'shame on police thugs' - references to those detained during violence last week between demonstrators and the police

Protesters, who have been largely leaderless during the rallies, then marched in the sweltering heat of about 30 degrees Celsius (86°F) to police headquarters in Wan Chai, with many chanting 'release the righteous' and 'shame on police thugs' - references to those detained during violence last week between demonstrators and the police

One protester, 63-year-old Wong Fung-yiu, has been joining the protests since they started two weeks ago, each time waving a large Union Jack flag, a tribute to the British colonial era

One protester, 63-year-old Wong Fung-yiu, has been joining the protests since they started two weeks ago, each time waving a large Union Jack flag, a tribute to the British colonial era

Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong speaks to protesters outside the police headquarters in Hong Kong. He urged police chief Stephen Lo to speak to the protesters, while others expressed anger at how some police have treated the demonstrators

Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong speaks to protesters outside the police headquarters in Hong Kong. He urged police chief Stephen Lo to speak to the protesters, while others expressed anger at how some police have treated the demonstrators

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam apologised on Tuesday for her mishandling of the unpopular extradition bill

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam apologised on Tuesday for her mishandling of the unpopular extradition bill

'There are several main things that we want to achieve today - that the government completely retract the law,  drop all charges against those arrested in last Wednesday's clashes, investigate allegations of police brutality and stop referring to the protests as a riot,' said teacher Freddie Fong, 32, one of those gathered outside police headquarters. 

'It's a peaceful protest today. There are no clashes with the police so far. I intend to stay until midnight,' he told MailOnline.

He added that calling for Lam's resignation is no longer the priority for protesters anymore, since her stepping down wouldn't make a difference as Hong Kong people do not have universal suffrage.

Hong Kong's chief executive is pre-screened by a nominating committee before being elected by a 1,200-member electoral college of the city's political elite, then appointed by the Central People's Government.

Wang Fung-yiu waves a union flag near government headquarters in Admiralty in Hong Kong during a protest this morning

Wang Fung-yiu waves a union flag near government headquarters in Admiralty in Hong Kong during a protest this morning

Protesters told MailOnline that the fresh rallies today are peaceful and there had not been clashes with the police

Protesters told MailOnline that the fresh rallies today are peaceful and there had not been clashes with the police

The protest comes after the government refused to meet the demands of demonstrators who have marched in their millions to oppose a bill that would allow extraditions to the Chinese mainland

The protest comes after the government refused to meet the demands of demonstrators who have marched in their millions to oppose a bill that would allow extraditions to the Chinese mainland

Opposition groups, after putting on the biggest political rallies in Hong Kong's history, have called for the complete withdrawal of the extradition legislation. Government offices were ordered closed Friday 'due to security considerations'

Opposition groups, after putting on the biggest political rallies in Hong Kong's history, have called for the complete withdrawal of the extradition legislation. Government offices were ordered closed Friday 'due to security considerations'

Protesters, who have been largely leaderless during the rallies, then marched in the sweltering heat of about 30 degrees Celsius (86°F) to police headquarters in Wan Chai, with many chanting 'release the righteous' and 'shame on police thugs' - references to those detained during violence last week between demonstrators and the police

Protesters, who have been largely leaderless during the rallies, then marched in the sweltering heat of about 30 degrees Celsius (86°F) to police headquarters in Wan Chai, with many chanting 'release the righteous' and 'shame on police thugs' - references to those detained during violence last week between demonstrators and the police

The protest comes after the government refused to meet the demands of demonstrators who have marched in their millions to oppose a bill that would allow extraditions to the Chinese mainland.

Opposition groups, after putting on the biggest political rallies in Hong Kong's history, have called for the complete withdrawal of the extradition legislation. Government offices were ordered closed Friday 'due to security considerations.'

After meeting at Hong Kong's main government complex before the morning rush hour, hundreds of protesters - many wearing face masks, goggles and carrying umbrellas - temporarily blocked a major city artery.

Outrage remains high over heavy-handed police tactics used against protesters June 12, including the firing of 150 rounds of tear gas, rubber bullets and beanbag rounds, and the beating of unarmed protesters by police with truncheons. 

Some protesters removed metal barricades and re-arranged them in an apparent bid to fortify their positions outside the police headquarters, as officials closed the gate to the facility's main driveway

Some protesters removed metal barricades and re-arranged them in an apparent bid to fortify their positions outside the police headquarters, as officials closed the gate to the facility's main driveway

Police have since eased their approach, hoping to avoid a replay of the events of September 2014, when officers unleashed 87 rounds of tear gas at protesters who had amassed in the same location as the current protesters

Police have since eased their approach, hoping to avoid a replay of the events of September 2014, when officers unleashed 87 rounds of tear gas at protesters who had amassed in the same location as the current protesters

Outrage remains high over heavy-handed police tactics used against protesters June 12, including the firing of 150 rounds of tear gas, rubber bullets and beanbag rounds, and the beating of unarmed protesters by police with truncheons

Outrage remains high over heavy-handed police tactics used against protesters June 12, including the firing of 150 rounds of tear gas, rubber bullets and beanbag rounds, and the beating of unarmed protesters by police with truncheons

Protesters gather outside police headquarters this morning with a sign reading 'Do not shoot we are HongKongers'

Protesters gather outside police headquarters this morning with a sign reading 'Do not shoot we are HongKongers'

Lawmakers and others have also complained that riot police wore no identification numbers on their uniforms, making it that much more difficult to file formal complaints.

Police have since eased their approach, hoping to avoid a replay of the events of September 2014, when officers unleashed 87 rounds of tear gas at protesters who had amassed in the same location as the current protesters. When the smoke from that response cleared, bigger crowds returned, angrier than before, and didn't leave for nearly three months. 

Some protesters removed metal barricades and re-arranged them in an apparent bid to fortify their positions outside the police headquarters, as officials closed the gate to the facility's main driveway.

Others used plastic bags and umbrellas to cover up surveillance cameras as a means of guarding their identities against potential retribution from government or school authorities. Many protesters have been wary of giving their full names and some have obscured their features with facemasks. 

'I am here to protest against police violence,' Wang Fung-yiu retiree told The Guardian. 'We don't want the police to hurt people, arrest people and to use pepper spray on us. This is sheer injustice'

'I am here to protest against police violence,' Wang Fung-yiu retiree told The Guardian. 'We don't want the police to hurt people, arrest people and to use pepper spray on us. This is sheer injustice'

Protesters tape up a banner with the words 'Never give in' as they surround the police headquarters in Hong Kong today

Protesters tape up a banner with the words 'Never give in' as they surround the police headquarters in Hong Kong today

The call for Friday's protest was made by the city's student unions, as well as informal organisers over social media

The call for Friday's protest was made by the city's student unions, as well as informal organisers over social media

Many unfurled umbrellas to protect themselves from the sun, and first-aid volunteers sprayed water on others to cool down

Many unfurled umbrellas to protect themselves from the sun, and first-aid volunteers sprayed water on others to cool down

Protesters use umbrella to block security cameras on the wall of Wanchai Police headquarters in Hong Kong

Protesters use umbrella to block security cameras on the wall of Wanchai Police headquarters in Hong Kong

'There (is)... a large crowd surrounding the police headquarters which... (can) affect police emergency services to the public,' senior superintendent Yu Hoi Kwan told reporters, appealing to the crowd to disperse.

She said a negotiating team would be sent to speak with the protesters.

Many unfurled umbrellas to protect themselves from the sun, and first-aid volunteers sprayed water on others to cool them down.

'The government still hasn't responded to our demands, After so many days... they are all talking rubbish,' protester Poyee Chan, 28, told AFP.

'So I feel we need to come out and tell them: we citizens won't accept such fake responses.'

One protester, 63-year-old Wong Fung-yiu, has been joining the protests since they started two weeks ago, each time waving a large Union Jack flag, a tribute to the British colonial era. 

'I am here to protest against police violence,' the retiree told The Guardian. 'We don't want the police to hurt people, arrest people and to use pepper spray on us. This is sheer injustice.' 

Several hundred mainly student protesters gathered outside Hong Kong's police headquarters this morning, with some blocking traffic on a major thoroughfare, after a deadline passed for meeting their demands related to controversial extradition legislation that many see as eroding the territory's judicial independence

Several hundred mainly student protesters gathered outside Hong Kong's police headquarters this morning, with some blocking traffic on a major thoroughfare, after a deadline passed for meeting their demands related to controversial extradition legislation that many see as eroding the territory's judicial independence

Demonstrators were urged to wear googles and other protective gear during the rally in case it gets violent

Demonstrators were urged to wear googles and other protective gear during the rally in case it gets violent 

Leader Carrie Lam has insisted the legislation is needed for Hong Kong to uphold justice and not become a magnet for fugitives. It would expand the scope of criminal suspect transfers to include mainland China, Taiwan and Macau

Leader Carrie Lam has insisted the legislation is needed for Hong Kong to uphold justice and not become a magnet for fugitives. It would expand the scope of criminal suspect transfers to include mainland China, Taiwan and Macau

The call for Friday's protest was made by the city's student unions, as well as informal organisers over social media and messaging apps like Telegram. 

'Blossom everywhere,' read a statement circulated Thursday in a Telegram chat group.

'There are many ways to participate. Think carefully about your own ways to show your love to Hong Kong. June 21 is not the end of the fight, there will be more in the coming days.'

Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong, who walked free from prison on Monday, urged police chief Stephen Lo to speak to the protesters, while others expressed anger at how some police have treated the demonstrators.

'We are mad at how they treat the protesters,' said Democratic lawmaker Ted Hui Chi-fung.

Lam has so far defied calls to step down, and while she has apologised and suspended the bill indefinitely, it has failed to quell anger.

Lam has so far defied calls to step down, and while she has apologised and suspended the bill indefinitely, it has failed to quell anger

Lam has so far defied calls to step down, and while she has apologised and suspended the bill indefinitely, it has failed to quell anger

Although Hong Kong was returned from British to Chinese rule in 1997, it is still administered separately under an arrangement known as 'One country, two systems'

Although Hong Kong was returned from British to Chinese rule in 1997, it is still administered separately under an arrangement known as 'One country, two systems'

Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong, who walked free from prison on Monday, urged police chief Stephen Lo to speak to the protesters, while others expressed anger at how some police have treated the demonstrators

Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong, who walked free from prison on Monday, urged police chief Stephen Lo to speak to the protesters, while others expressed anger at how some police have treated the demonstrators

Although Hong Kong was returned from British to Chinese rule in 1997, it is still administered separately under an arrangement known as 'One country, two systems'.

The city enjoys freedoms unseen on the mainland but many residents have been alarmed in recent years by what they feel is a tighter grip by Beijing.

Opponents of the extradition bill fear it will ensnare the people of Hong Kong in mainland China's opaque and politicised justice system, and also give Beijing a tool to target critics based in the semi-autonomous territory.

The Chinese government had supported the extradition proposal, and accused protest organisers of colluding with Western governments. It dismissed expressions of support for the Hong Kong opposition as interference in the city - and China's - internal affairs.

But Beijing said after the bill's suspension that it respected and understood the decision.

Wang Fung-yiu waves a union flag in tribute to Hong Kong's former ruler and in defiance against the Chinese government

Wang Fung-yiu waves a union flag in tribute to Hong Kong's former ruler and in defiance against the Chinese government

The Chinese government had supported the extradition proposal, and accused protest organisers of colluding with Western governments. It dismissed expressions of support for the Hong Kong opposition as interference in the city - and China's - internal affairs

The Chinese government had supported the extradition proposal, and accused protest organisers of colluding with Western governments. It dismissed expressions of support for the Hong Kong opposition as interference in the city - and China's - internal affairs

The city enjoys freedoms unseen on the mainland but many residents have been alarmed in recent years by what they feel is a tighter grip by Beijing

The city enjoys freedoms unseen on the mainland but many residents have been alarmed in recent years by what they feel is a tighter grip by Beijing

Friday's marchers demanded that the government drop all charges against those arrested in last week's clashes, charge police with what they describe as violent action and stop referring to the protests as a riot

Friday's marchers demanded that the government drop all charges against those arrested in last week's clashes, charge police with what they describe as violent action and stop referring to the protests as a riot

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