Boy, 10, left paralysed when elderly driver hit him

Boy, 10, left paralysed, blind a

Boy, 10, left paralysed when elderly driver hit him

Boy, 10, left paralysed, blind and with learning difficulties when elderly driver hit his pushchair on zebra crossing when he was aged six months is in line for up to £10m compensation

  • The boy was being pushed by his mother when the 70-year-old collided with him
  • He suffered 'catastrophic brain damage' and will always need 24-hour care 
  • Mr Justice Kerr praised the boy's mother for continuously supporting him 

A ten-year-old boy who was left paralysed after an elderly driver hit his pushchair on a zebra crossing when he was just six-months-old could receive up to £10 million in compensation.

The boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was being pushed by his mother when the driver in her 70s collided with him.

According to the now 10-year-old's barrister, Richard Lynagh QC, he suffered 'catastrophic brain damage' in the 2009 tragedy and will always need 24-hour care.

The High Court in London (pictured above) heard that the youngster will receive payments to help fund his health care

The High Court in London (pictured above) heard that the youngster will receive payments to help fund his health care 

At the hearing at the High Court in London today, Mr Justice Kerr praised the youngster's mother for continuing to care for her son.

Paralysed in all four limbs, he has severe learning difficulties and is almost totally blind, he told London's High Court.

Although the motorist who hit him has recently died, Mr Lynagh said he had never disputed liability for the accident and her insurers had now agreed to settle the boy's damages claim.

Mr Justice Kerr (above) praised the boy's mother for continuously caring for her son

Mr Justice Kerr (above) praised the boy's mother for continuously caring for her son

Together with a £5 million lump sum, he will receive index-linked and tax-free annual payments to cover the costs of his care for life. 

Those will start at £160,000-a-year, rising in steps to £265,000-a-year when he reaches the age of 19, the court heard.

Despite the gravity of his disabilities, he is, thanks to his mother's selfless care, expected to live into his 30s, said Mr Lynagh.

Defence counsel, Julian Matthews, said everyone involved in the case was 'completely impressed, if not overwhelmed, by the efforts that his mother has made and the progress he has achieved due to her unstinting care.'

Describing the accident as a 'terrible and tragic', Mr Justice Kerr had no hesitation in approving the 'just and reasonable' settlement.

'I single out the mother for praise...she has risen heroically to the challenge of caring for her son,' he concluded.

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